Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

I’m hoping to bring some clarity to what SSI is, and isn’t, for families with disabilities. It’s not a magic bullet, it doesn’t pay for everything. But for those with little to no other resources, or the ability to earn a sustainable wage, it can be a life line. It’s also NOT money provided by our Social Security taxes – it’s paid by general tax revenues.

In Maryland, and many other states, eligibility for SSI automatically grants Medicaid to the beneficiary. If you’re not sure if you’re state does, Elizabeth Dickey’s article provides a great breakdown (Disability Secrets). The financial benefit is $750/mth (single) and $1,125/mth if individual has a qualified spouse. It’s meant to pay for food and lodging, and there are limits to how much you can earn, and how much you can maintain in assets.

2018’s earning limits = $17,040; and SSI payments will be phased out as you reach this limit. There are programs to enable individuals to work while still collecting SSI. Rather than trying to explain it all here, please follow this link (SSI and Work). My personal bias – if you, or your family member, can work – they should. Paying into the system allows them to start earning credits towards retirement; among many other benefits.

If you have a child who you think will qualify for SSI – apply as soon as possible. Until the child is 18, determination will be made based upon your household’s income and assets. As soon as they turn 18 this changes to the individual’s income and assets; so apply on their 18th birthday. You’re going to need to be able to prove the disability, and the individual’s inability to perform any gainful employment – so keep ALL  your documents. I used Google Drive, as well as keeping hard copies.

I also hired a disability attorney. I met mine through networking, but looking online led me to the American Bar Association’s lawyer finder. I can’t attest to how easy it is to use, and my preference remains getting a referral from someone who has already been through the process successfully. You’re going to want to keep all your original documents; and be patient – the process can take several months.

Next week I’ll take a deeper dive into the additional benefits your child becomes eligible for if they are approved for SSI before the age of 22. I’ll also explore things to consider when planning – but this is a broad sweep. I can’t take into consideration individual’s circumstances. Bottom line, SSI is a critical tool for those who need it – but in my opinion it shouldn’t be viewed as the best, or only, go to.

 

 

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Author: Eric Jorgensen

I am a retired, widowed, disabled veteran who has a son on the Autism spectrum. I have learned, and accepted, I am owed nothing. I'm a proponent for people taking responsibility for their own actions, and making changes to their circumstances if they're not happy. My mission is to help people help themselves, by raising awareness of resources available, pointing them in the right direction; and being a coach, mentor, cheerleader. I've founded the Christine Jorgensen Foundation - which will pay for therapies (speech, physical, occupational, etc...) for those that have been declined by insurance or need more than approved for - on a referral only basis; and Special Needs Navigator - a for profit company to help individuals and families find their way through the disability resources labyrinth.

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