I may be hypersensitive to this because of my concerns for my son’s benefits, but it feels like a common theme when trying to cut government spending is reducing what is spent on public programs – like SNAP or Medicaid. To add insult to injury, this seems to become a bandwagon, with the most vocal people chiming in about how the majority of people they see using these programs are abusing them.

I’d like to challenge this with one thought – you see what you look for. If you’ve convinced yourself (or allowed yourself to be convinced by media) these programs are only being taken advantage of; then because of a phenomenon known as confirmation bias, this is exactly what you will see.

SNAP, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, is designed to help people put food on their tables; but the benefit is not large enough (by design) to allow people to live off surf and turf every night. The USDA website provides an overview of what SNAP can purchase, and notably absent are things like alcohol, cigarettes, pet food, soda, candy, etc.

This program also places strict limitations on how long “Able Bodied Adults” (age 18 – 49 w/o dependents or a disability) can receive benefits – 3 months in 3 years, if they don’t meet special work requirements. I’ve included a link to the SNAP eligibility page here; because I think it’s important we form our opinions from verified facts, rather than blindly believing what we’ve been told. And please, take a moment if you catch yourself trying to argue to really explore where this feeling is coming from – is it because you don’t want to be proven wrong, or can you substantiate your belief with facts.

Is there abuse, almost certainly. The unfortunate truth is there will always be those who try to take advantage of a system. But a bigger truth is approximately 41 million Americans struggle to put food on the table (source Feeding America). Poverty is real, it’s not as simple as telling the elderly, those with disabilities or just out of work to “find a job”. Are you hiring?

Don’t be quick to judge next time you see someone using a SNAP debit card, this could be you during the next economic downturn or after a random accident. Take some time to educate yourself on the benefit amount and restrictions by going to the source, not Fox news or CNN. For convenience, here’s a link to the USDA website. And perhaps most important of all, don’t lose sight of the fact these are people, just like you.


Forever GI Bill

Fellow veterans – there have been a LOT of changes lately, offering new, and expanding the reach of old, benefits. Below is a highlight reel of the Forever GI Bill (but don’t let this be the extent of your own research); subsequent posts will expand on other changes. This is a long post (21 bullets), please at least skim to determine if any apply to you. Unless otherwise specified, these changes will take effect 1 August 2018.

Forever GI Bill (aka Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act)

  1. Reserve Duty counts towards Post-9/11 Eligibility – Reservist authorized (ordered to AD) medical care, disability evaluation or health care study on or after 11 Sept 2001 counts as Active Duty towards eligibility.
  2. Purple Heart Recipients – anyone who was awarded a Purple Heart on or after 11 Sept 2001 is eligible for 100% benefit for 36 months.
  3. Yellow Ribbon Extension – Recipients of the Fry Scholarship and Purple Heart will be covered under the Yellow Ribbon Program.
  4. Yellow Ribbon Extension to AD Service Members – AD Servicemembers may use the Yellow Ribbon Program effective 1 August 2022.
  5. Consolidation of Benefit Levels – see chart, effective 1 August 2020.
  6. Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP) Eligibility – Reservists who established eligibility under REAP prior to 25 November 2015, and lost it due to the sunset provision, may elect to have that service credited towards the Post-9/11 program.
  7. Monthly Housing Allowance (MHA) – Will be calculated based on zip code of campus where student is attending the majority of classes, rather than location of the institute the student is enrolled.
  8. Changes to Licensing & Certification Charges – Entitlement charges will be prorated based on the actual amount of the fee charged for the test.
  9. Assistance for Students Affected by School Closures and Certain Disapprovals – VA is now authorized to restore benefits & provide relief. There is a LOT to this, read here.
  10. Transfer of Benefits Changes – Can now transfer entitlement if the original dependent dies prior to using the entitlement. Dependents can transfer entitlement to other dependents if Servicemember/Veteran dies. Applies to deaths on/after 1 August 2009.
  11. More benefits for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Programs – Another benefit with a LOT to it, read here.
  12. 15-Year Elimination – Time limitation is removed for individuals whose last discharge or release from AD is on/after 1 January 2013. Also applies to children of deceased Servicemembers entitled on/after 1 January 2013 and all Fry spouses.
  13. Reserve Components MHA – VA will prorate MHA for Reservists.
  14. Pilot Programs for Technology Courses – I haven’t seen much detail, just a heads up it’s coming.
  15. Work Study Expansion – Expiration date (30 June 2022) has been removed for certain qualifying work-study activities in which an individual may be paid additional educational assistance allowance.
  16. Changes to Survivors’ & Dependents’ Educational AssistanceDecreased entitlement from 45 months to 36 months. Also increases amount of educational assistance payable under the Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program.
  17. Technical Schools and non-Institutions of Higher Learning – Must be accredited; expanded to include area career and technical education schools.
  18. Priority Enrollment – VA improving outreach and transparency about which institutions administer a priority enrollment system.
  19. Informing Schools about Beneficiary Entitlement – VA must make available to educational institutions information about the amount of educational assistance to which a beneficiary is entitled under chapter 30, 32, 33, or 35.
  20. Reserve Component Benefits – Guard and Reserve members with service in the Armed Forces occurring on/after 30 June 2008 may be able to receive Post-9/11 benefits.
  21. GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance – Individuals who first use Post-9/11 on/after 1 January 2018 will receive monthly housing allowance based on DoD’s reduced basic housing allowance (BAH). Those that began using benefits prior to January 1, 2018 will continue to receive a higher monthly housing rate based in the non-adjusted BAH rate

The Parents’ Place of Maryland

I’ve been researching resources since 2012, and I didn’t really know what the Parents’ Place of Maryland was until I met their new Executive Director, Rene Averitt-Sanzone, in 2017. I’d heard of them, but I didn’t think they were a resource I could use because I didn’t think they had a presence in Montgomery County (even though it has the State in its name).

Since meeting Rene I’ve taken time to research and learn more about The Parents’ Place, and I’m excited to share – I would like this to reach every family in Maryland who is looking for resources.

Who They Are 

The Parents’ Place of Maryland, like so many other organizations focused on helping those with disabilities and their families, was founded in 1990 as a grass-roots organization by families, professionals and community leaders. Their Mission (from the website) is “to empower families as advocates and partners in improving education and health outcomes for their children with disabilities and special health care needs”; and from everything I’ve seen they walk the talk.

What They Do 

The Parents’ Place of Maryland offers help in (3) distinct ways: one-on-on support, information & resources, and training programs. If you’re not sure they can help, reach out – if they aren’t the right resource, they can probably direct you to whoever is. Their information & resources page links to a library covering a host of topics, from bullying to transition (and SO much more!); a Services Directory and a Podcast offering “RealTalk for Parents”. The training programs are available to parents/families and professionals, but I wasn’t able to find a calendar highlighting what’s available so you’re best option (as far as I can tell) is to call and see what’s coming.

What Else Should I Know

Since they were founded, they have helped over 10,000 families and professionals – providing information, training and support. They’ve held over 70 workshops, and offered 10 conferences; and have sent over 300,000 informational and educational materials – with a staff of less than 15 and over half of their employees are “Parent Educators”.


I am not an employee of The Parents’ Place of Maryland, and any errors noted are my own. If I have misrepresented, or misstated anything please provide constructive feedback so I may make the appropriate change(s). All opinions and views are my own.

The Struggle is Real

Lately I’ve been on a kick to help people motivate themselves to maintain momentum, if moving forward; or overcome inertia if they’re at a crossroads; and today I want to share a few of my current challenges and strategies.

My son turned 18 recently – leading me to start the process for his SSI, updating DFAS so he maintains eligibility for my military pension and TRICARE, and updating the VA to keep my disability payments at their current level (with a dependent). Given his disabilities I’m also applying for Guardianship. As you may be able to imagine (or perhaps can relate having been through already), this in itself can feel like a full time job.

The first challenge I’ve come across is how to help my son receive his full SSI benefit and the adult disabled child benefit (survivor benefit) from my wife. If both go to traditional savings or checking accounts, the SSI will be offset by the other benefit. So my first thought was his ABLE account, because the assets are not considered when determining SSI eligibility.

Unfortunately, his ABLE account is not equipped to receive electronic deposits – so Strike 1. No problem, I need a 1st Party Special Needs Trust anyway, for the military’s Survivor Benefit Plan; I’ll just send the adult disabled benefit there. My intent was to complete ALL the estate documents at once – 1st & 3rd party SNT’s, Guardianship, DPOA, etc – and I was on a great trajectory.

Was being the operative word. I was able to get the Physician’s letter, no problem. However, I also need a Social Worker letter – and because he’s never received services (DDA “future need”) – he hasn’t worked with a Social Worker. His teacher gave me a couple options, and although neither was viable I appreciate her time and effort. So now we’re in a sort of limbo while I figure this piece out.

Rather than let the whole process stall, I’ve decided to move forward with everything else, and finish the Guardianship as I’m able. I’m also working on engaging the DDA again, since my son is an adult and they should be able to help me with the transition from High School at age 21.

The last piece on my plate (as far as I’m aware) is following up with DORS again – getting my son employment assistance. I’ve been working on this for (2)  years, since he turned 16 – it had been my hope to have him working summers; getting used to the routines necessary to be successful post-high school. That hasn’t materialized, yet, but I will redouble my efforts towards the end of this school year.

All of this is meant only to show I understand how frustrating and time consuming it can be. And I get it can be overwhelming, especially if it’s all taken into consideration at once. The best thing I think anyone can do is pick one item and work it until the next steps are out of your control; rinse and repeat. Not sure how to prioritize, ask for help. I started a company – Special Needs Navigator – just for this purpose, and it’s my belief there are other resources like this throughout the country; although it may take some work to find them.

Don’t give up, as the image I selected shows success could be the next step you take. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, stop and take a breath. Help yourself, establish routines to give yourself a mental/emotional recharge – the pause and refresh will help you identify alternatives you may otherwise miss. Keep charging – you’ve got this!

Adversity – Furnace or Forge

Life can be difficult and is often unfair. I don’t think anyone would argue, and I’m willing to bet many of us have felt like throwing our hands in the air and saying “enough is enough – I quit”. The difference is what happens at this point – do you actually give up, consumed by the fires; or do you push through, overcoming the situation/circumstance with new tools and beliefs?

I’ve done both, it’s taken me many years to recognize there is always another side to adversity – it’s just how long it’s going to take you to get through. The more you do to help yourself when things are going well, the shorter (generally) the impact will last. The trick, in my opinion, is understanding (1) you’re not alone, and (2) you have more tools than you may be giving yourself credit for.

Develop habits when things are going well, so you don’t need to think about “how” to do something when life throws you a curve ball. Commit to sitting down with the most positive person you know at least twice a month, when you are at the bottom of a hole they can extend a rope; and if it’s a habit/routine they will know may be up if you miss one or two appointments.

Financially, commit to setting aside at least $25 each week in an online savings account – where you don’t have ready access. This creates the habit of spending, but it also gives you a lifeline when those “oh craps” occur. If you can afford to do more, then build up gradually to what you’re comfortable setting aside – but don’t start too big. The intent is to not notice it, so you will continue.

When bad things happen look for correlations to how you are feeling. At some point in the past you more than likely felt very similar, even if it was to a lesser degree. How did you overcome it then? Use those tools, adapting as necessary to fit your current circumstance.

Some changes cannot be undone. I will never get my wife back, nor will my son’s Autism go away. That doesn’t mean we can’t, or shouldn’t, live our lives to the fullest. We’ve adapted, and so can you. Do your best to never let circumstances identify who you are. Continue to grow, seek new experiences and don’t fear failure. And as I’ve said so often before – quit trying to be a one-person show. Instead be the conductor and surround yourself with people who have achieved what you’re aiming for and have similar values and ethics.


VET TIX provides tickets to events which reduce stress, strengthen family bonds, build life-long memories and encourage service members and veterans to stay engaged with local communities and American life. We support our troops by honoring their service and providing positive family and life experiences, during and after their years of service to our country (Retrieved from https://www.vettix.org/index.php). As a veteran I’m honored an organization has taken this unique approach to help Active Duty military and veterans; and I want to help them get their message out.

Who They Are 

VET TIX has (2) programs I’m aware of, Tickets for Troops and Hero’s Wish.

Tickets for Troops uses partnerships with major sports teams, organizations and event ticket holders to give active duty military and honorably discharged veterans free and discounted tickets. Military personnel, especially junior enlisted, do not make very much money – this is an amazing opportunity for our service members.

Hero’s Wish aims to ease the burden on families who have lost a loved one (KIA), been injured (WIA) or is currently deployed; by providing a once in a lifetime expense at an event. Their services are available to active duty personnel in a 6 month before/after deployment, severely wounded, or families of those killed in action. They provide a list of current hero’s wishes here.

What They Do 

VET TIX’s website has a link for veterans to create an account – where you will identify the type (active duty, retired, etc). From there they will verify the information, because they want to ensure veterans, and their families, are the ones being served. The applicants will let VET TIX know what event they would like to attend, and from there VET TIX works to secure tickets. The attendees will pay a small fee, much less than the full cost if they were to buy it themselves, to receive their tickets.

What Else Should I Know


Two of the three founders served in the military, and the third’s father had served – so all three are familiar with the sacrifices service members and their families experience. Their Core Values of Patriotism, Support & Recognition, Quality of Life and Family really resonated with me – and as I learned more about VET TIX it became clearer and clearer that they are the “real deal”.


I am not an employee of Vet TIX and any errors noted are my own. If I have misrepresented, or misstated anything please provide constructive feedback so I may make the appropriate change(s). All opinions and views are my own.

Make Inertia Work For You

I chose the image for this blog because I think it’s what most people think of when they hear the word “inertia”. Sadly, this is only half the story. Inertia means something is going to maintain its current state until acted upon by an outside force. So yes – if the object is at rest, it will remain at rest. BUT, and this is IMPORTANT, it also means if an object is in motion it will remain in motion.

I’m passionate about helping people become successful, and often the first step is overcoming their current state of inertia. When you’re not doing something it becomes much easier to identify ALL the reasons not to change – it’s the wrong time, it will cost too much, etc. Let’s assume all of these are valid concerns; when are they going to change? The truth is most of them will not. The universe isn’t going to line up the stars, moons & planets for your convenience; and products/services are going to continue rising in cost (or fade away).

So instead of focusing on reasons not to do something, identify WHY you want to make the change. Something had to drive you to this point, and if it’s truly important to you do take action – any action, no matter how small.

Taking action overcomes your current state of inertia – it’s the force necessary to start momentum in a different direction. The longer you’ve been in your current mode, the more effort you are going to need to exert to enact the change. Don’t give up if you don’t see results right away; things take time.

Think of any changes you’ve made recently – be it weight loss, changing jobs, or going back to school (to list a few examples). When you first started it probably sucked, it was uncomfortable and you had to get into a new routine. Eventually you stopped noticing, and it just became a habit; inertia has set in.

Understanding this is important, because you can use it to help yourself become more successful. Let’s use networking for example, because I think most (if not all) of us need to network to some degree; and many of us have an immense dislike for it. Start by introducing yourself to at least one new person everyday, and make small talk. As you become more comfortable with this expand it; get to know everyone in your company – not just those you interact with every day. Before you know it, it will have become second nature and you’re on your way to mastering a new skill which (in my opinion) will go a long way to aiding your success.

Inertia is difficult to overcome, so don’t be afraid to seek assistance. Use an accountability partner, someone who will call you on your excuses and offer encouragement. They will also help you maintain perspective, because it’s often difficult to notice change within yourself – especially when it’s occurring gradually.

So what are you waiting for? September is just around the corner, let’s end 2017 with a BANG. Pick one thing you’ve been “meaning to do”; find yourself an accountability partner (friend, trusted advisor, family, etc); and put inertia to work. Let’s get your constant velocity angled upwards – 2018 look out, because here we come!