Nothing Wrong with Simplicity

I think we make our lives more difficult than we need to – in all aspects. Almost like we think we’re doing something wrong if we can explain ourselves in one sentence. But in my opinion, this is what we should be striving for. Life is complicated enough, I don’t feel like it needs any help from me.

More often than not I’ve found the mantra “keep it simple” has steered me in the right direction – even (or especially) when I’m working with clients. To be clear, you must absolutely do your due diligence when considering alternatives, but I’ve found those that you can easily understand and require the least amount of effort will often work.

This shouldn’t necessarily be applied when pursuing a degree or picking a home to live in for the rest of your life – because there is usually a lot of other things to take into consideration. But how you pay for school, or the home, shouldn’t be that complicated or fancy.

Call me boring, but I like to set things in place and then forget about them – secure in the knowledge that it’s doing what it’s supposed to do. Saving for college in a 529 plan – why not pick a target date fund with the year closest to when you’ll need the money? The same goes for your current employer sponsored retirement plan. Both of these will likely have a bunch of other options available, and not necessarily anyone available to help select what works best for you.

Alternatively you could hire someone to take care of it for you; my only input being make sure you understand what they are doing. This can apply to having a housekeeper, landscaper or financial advisor – in each case you’ll want to be very clear of your expectations, and understand what they will be delivering. Once the ground rules are laid, you can shift your focus to other things – circling back periodically to check on things.

Don’t Let the Tail Wag the Dog

I enjoy coaching business owners, helping them determine where they can increase efficiency and dial in their focus running the business – as opposed to the business running them. Over the years I’ve found some very common themes – “not enough time” and “too much to do”; both of which can be addressed by stepping outside the business and looking at it as a perspective buyer, rather than the owner. Buyers look for opportunities and weaknesses (so they can bid the price down), they’re not emotionally invested in the company and won’t make excuses about why something is happening.

Unfortunately, many of us get so wrapped up in the day-to-day operations we lose sight of the bigger picture – where we want our company to be in 5, 10 or 20 years; and what is the core service or product our business provides. If you don’t have a vision for your company, or if you can’t put your finger on the core service/product, then ask yourself why you’re a business owner. Sure, there’s a lot of hype right now encouraging people to be entrepreneurs and chase their passion; but that passion may be met through hobbies or volunteering at much less cost than starting a business.

Same goes for “side hustles”. Unless you’re working part-time for someone else, you should be treating your hustle like a business. If you’re an Uber or Lyft driver, or you rent room(s) on Airbnb, then understand what your expenses are – please don’t delude yourself into thinking what you earn is “all profit”. I would also like to encourage those of you with side hustles to ask yourself “why”. Why do you have the hustle, what is the money going to help you do? Take this answer and make sure you’re taking the steps necessary to follow through.

Perhaps you’re saying “sure, this all sounds like a great idea; but you just don’t understand how busy I am”. Again, I challenge you to think as a buyer. Do you care how busy someone is, do you let them off the hook for a poorly delivered service or product? No, of course you don’t – so why are you treating yourself any different?

Make the time. Set at least one day each month aside for your business. Instead of arguing how much business  you’re going to lose (cost); think of it as an investment which will increase your profits by improving efficiency and honing your focus. Create an agenda for your day, and follow it. It’s going to feel weird at first, and maybe you’re not super productive right away – it’s a new skill and it’s going to take time to get good at it. Don’t give up, push through. If you’re not sure how to start find a mentor or hire a coach.

I need to stay busy, but I don’t like to waste my time. Think back to why you started your business or side-hustle; I’m willing to bet it wasn’t so you filled your every waking moment with work. Be honest with yourself, do you really want to run a business? Be okay with the answer, whatever it is, and take the necessary steps to be successful. Just do something.

Do You Have/Need an Exit Strategy?

Recently I’ve been receiving not so subtle reminders of how finite our lives are, and how much of a difference having a plan can make. I think we can all agree it’s impossible to plan for every eventuality, but I also think we can all agree there is at least one exit we are all going to make – to the best of my knowledge nobody has found the secret to immortality in our present state (this is not meant as a religious or philosophical post).

I remember how torn I was, weighing whether to reenlist or not. I retired with over 20 years, but if I’m completely honest with myself it’s not because I loved the Navy. The biggest reason I stayed was fear – I wasn’t sure what I would do about health insurance for my son – having received the Autism diagnosis in the early 2000’s and there not being much information available (that we were aware of). This had negative consequences – I was not someone anyone would want to be around; I felt trapped and took it out on everyone around me.

I think many, if not all, of us can relate to feeling trapped at some point in our lives – be it in a marriage, or a job or some other contract. And because this can be so overwhelming it’s easy for us to lose sight of options, convincing ourselves there is absolutely nothing we can do to make our situation better – regardless of what those around us may be proposing.

If you have kids, do you let them go through high school without talking to you about what their plan is after graduation? If the answer is “no”, then why are you treating yourself any different? This leads me to having an exit strategy – begin with the end in mind. Sounds trite, perhaps; but it will make a significant difference.

For example, no-one marries with the intent to divorce; but even if you don’t divorce the odds are one of you will outlive the other – even if it’s 50+ years down the road. Have a discussion of what you want, how you want to be remembered and where you want to be laid to rest – and put it in writing. Yes, this is an Estate plan; but it’s not meant to be set in stone – review it at major milestones, or at least every 5 years if you have nothing going on.

Another example I come across is similar to what I experienced in the Navy – people are afraid to leave their jobs (not just the military) because of uncertainty; will they make enough money, what else would they do, etc. In this case, my advice is to build yourself a “freedom fund”. Save money into an account with the strict purpose of giving you a buffer. How much is up to you, but I would suggest at least 6 months of income. I would also recommend you make a list of what is non-negotiable. What do you absolutely have to have – could be a minimum salary, specific benefit(s), etc; and also what you are completely unwilling to have in your life – could be too much autonomy, a micro-managing boss, specific working hours or days of the week, etc.

If you take nothing else away from reading this, please take the time to understand what’s most important to you. Don’t be upset or feel like you’re doing something wrong if your internal values don’t match your coworkers or friends – these are your values. When you are considering a change, especially a major one, take a moment to consider possible consequences. I’m doing this with my clients all the time, as I’d wager most Advisers are. Take it for what it’s meant to be, a glimpse of other possibilities; not finding fault with your ideas.

 

Automate This…

I realize what I’m about to say goes against what I perceive to be “conventional wisdom”. When I was Active Duty I earned my Lean Six Sigma Green Belt and I understand, quite well I think, how to become more efficient and eliminate waste. With this in mind, I’m not a fan of having my clients set their bills up for auto-pay, for a couple reasons.

First, if you’re not monitoring it you can’t manage it. If “extra” credits are added to your bills, or if your spending increases incrementally, you may not notice right away – if at all. This problem is compounded if you’re paying your bills via credit card, because at least you’re checking account will notify you if it’s been over-drafted – assuming you live off a budget and are transferring just what you routinely spend.

I don’t buy into the argument that it’s going to save you a lot time; after all – how much time does it really take to pay your bills every month? Speaking for myself, I like to know where my money is going, and it may take me a whole hour (if I’m distracted for 45 minutes) to login to my bank, review my bills and assign the payments from my checking account.

What I’ve noticed over the years, with clients and seminar attendees across the wealth spectrum, is a rise in individuals who admit they are not sure where all their money is going . Will paying your bills solve this; no, not necessarily. But it will force you to acknowledge, if only for the moment you’re transferring the money or writing the check, how much you have spent.

So next time you hear an efficiency guru recommend automating your life, I recommend thinking twice; and being honest with what it’s really saving you. Because, in my opinion, what you’re being saved isn’t time – it’s the sometimes harsh reality you’re spending much more than you would like to admit; and not saving nearly as much as you know you should be.